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Author Topic: What did Jesus mean by forgive 70 times 7? Was He giving us a clue about POR?  (Read 8555 times)

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Laodicea

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Jesus said that we should forgive 70 times 7.  Jesus never said anything that was trivial.  All that He said shed light from which His followers were to glean.  When one does a careful study of the use of these numbers (together) in the bible, he or she discovers something remarkable.  They point to elements of the plan of redemption...They point to God's final judgment and the close of probation.  We find these numbers together in the book of genesis.  Cain killed Able and God set a mark upon him lest anyone should think to kill Cain.  God would avenge 7 times for the murder of Cain.  Lamach, of the seed of Cain, was the next to kill.  Moses wrote that Lamach said if anyone should kill him, let God avenge 70 times for his death, since God avenges 7 times for Cain.  Moses wrote these numbers to point us to God's final judgment.  Jesus will not keep forgiving those who willfully sin or transgress the law.  Jesus cannot lie, thus He has given us clues to His definitive timing for forgiveness or mercy.  I must add that we should forgive always, so that we may be forgiven.  However, God will not let the world go on forever in its wicked state....

Isaiah wrote- The spirit of the Lord is upon me; because the Lord has anointed me to preach the good tidings unto the meek...To proclaim the acceptable year of the Lord... (Is 42:1-2).  Jesus, during His 3.5 year ministry, did proclaim the acceptable year of our Lord.  This is speaking of the vengeance or final judgments of God.  When we look at Matthew 24, we can find out about the acceptable year of our Lord.  Jesus began to tell His disciples of the coming trials and destructions and details of His return.  Backtracking, after the disciples were showing Him all the buildings of the Temple and their beauty, Jesus told them that the temple would be destroyed.  This sparked their curiosity and they wanted to know the sign of His coming and the end of the world.  And He told them!!!!!! Just as was prophesied by Isaiah.  He warned that "This generation shall not pass till all these things be fulfilled."  I will pause for us to take a look at the meaning of a "generation."  Moses wrote in Psalm 90, "The days of our years are three score and ten."  That is 70 years.  Jesus had warned that when they see the abomination that makes desolate stand in the holy place- run to the mountains, for there shall be a great time of trouble.  The disciples of Jesus ran to the mountains in 67 AD, after the Romans defiled the temple, by entering it. Jesus was born in 1AD and the temple was destroyed in 70 AD.  AS prophesied the acceptable year of the Lord concerning  judgment against Jerusalem was during His generation.  However, the Matthew 24 prophecy, concerning the abomination that makes desolate and running to the mountains is a trifold prophesy.  It has a 3 part fulfillment, for the Christians of the middle ages had to run when the Roman church was persecuting the faithful believers....and the end time church will soon have to run to the mountains- directly after the close of probation and, thus, the final fulfillment of this particular part of Matthew 24..…

…To be continued.  I will discuss the parable of the fig tree in my next entry.  Happy studies…

-Laodecia
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Bob Pickle

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Hi Laodicea.

If Jesus was born in 1 AD, could He have been about 30, as Luke says, when He was baptized?

What I recall is that Cestius surrounded Jerusalem in 66 AD rather than in 67 AD. That's what a number of websites say. And they also say that Cestius died by the spring of 67.
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Laodicea

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Hi Laodicea.

If Jesus was born in 1 AD, could He have been about 30, as Luke says, when He was baptized?

What I recall is that Cestius surrounded Jerusalem in 66 AD rather than in 67 AD. That's what a number of websites say. And they also say that Cestius died by the spring of 67.

Hello Bob,

Say Jesus was born in 3 BC.  By 28 AD, he would be 30 and baptized. (One had to be at least 30 to hold certain positions according to Moses' Law- ie priest-Numbers 4:3;23;30;35;39;&47). By 31 AD he would have been crucified and then resurrected.  By 70 AD those born at the same time that he was would have been 72.  So roughly, this is still a generation (...and if by reason of strength they be fourscore years psalm 90:10 This is life expectancy as written by Moses)

Here is an internet quote:

 "The procurator whose actions ultimately triggered an armed rebellion was Gessius Florus. He released robbers from prison for a price, then allowed them to continue their thefts for a share of the booty. The Jews complained to Cestius Gallus, the legate of Syria and Florus' immediate superior. Gallus could not or would not control Florus. The procurator next took 17 talents from the treasury of the Temple of Jerusalem. When the people protested, he marched his troops into the city and turned them loose to plunder and kill.

The Jewish people disagreed over what they should do. The priestly Sadducees and other leaders wanted to coexist with the occupiers and hope for a gentler successor to Florus. Nationalistic groups such as the Zealots were ready to fight. They had already been waging a guerrilla war of independence for years. One Zealot faction, known as the Sicarii, or knife-wielders, were urban terrorists who murdered people in the streets whom they viewed as Roman collaborators.

The captain of the Temple committed the first act of rebellion in July of 66 ad, when he stopped the twice daily offering of a bull and two lambs on behalf of the emperor and the Roman people. That slap in the Roman face alarmed Jerusalem's leading citizens, who requested troops from both Florus and Agrippa II, grandson of Herod the Great and king of the region north of Galilee known as Chalcis. Agrippa had no political authority in Jerusalem, but he maintained a palace there for himself and his sister Berenice. He was also in charge of the Temple.

In September, Agrippa sent 2,000 horsemen. They entered the Upper City and fought a battle of mutual slaughter against Zealots led by Eleazar. After seven days of bloody strife, Sicarii reinforcements helped the Zealots drive Agrippa's men from the city. At about the same time, the Sicarii leader Menahem and his men took Masada and returned to Jerusalem with a veritable arsenal of weapons. Their blood up, the victors in Jerusalem burned the house of the high priest and the palace of Agrippa and Berenice. They stormed the fortress Antonia, adjacent to the northwest corner of the Temple, and killed its Roman cohort. They laid siege to Herod's palace, then massacred all but the leader of its Roman garrison after promising a safe exit. Those murders on the Sabbath put the entire city in fear of both human and divine reprisal.

During that fighting, a rift developed between the Sicarii and the other zealots. The larger zealot faction drove the Sicarii out and killed Menahem, but the war between the two factions was far from over.

Cestius Gallus marched from Antioch, the Syrian capital, with an army of 18,000, destroying some towns in Galilee en route and receiving assurances of loyalty from others. Arriving at Jerusalem in early October, he entered the city through the unfinished third wall, which Agrippa I had begun building years before around the northern half of the city.

When the insurgents retreated to the Temple, Gallus' legionaries undermined the Temple wall and prepared to burn the Temple gate. The legate seemed close to crushing the rebellion when, for some reason, he ordered his forces to withdraw from the city. Gallus may have felt that he could not prevail against such courageous defenders. Instead of staying put, the Jews chased the retreating army, inflicting heavy damage as they went. In the northern suburb of Bezetha, the Jews descended on the column in force, killing 6,000 Romans and forcing Gallus to abandon his baggage and siege train. The rout left the rebels stocked with captured siege engines and swollen with confidence of future victories.

Many prominent Jews left Jerusalem to escape the inevitable Roman retaliation, but the leaders who remained there prepared to defend their country. They completed the third wall of the city and appointed men to mobilize resistance in different regions. To Galilee they sent a priest named Joseph ben Mattathias. Posterity would know him as Flavius Josephus, the principal historian of the Jewish War."
 ref: http://www.historynet.com/first-jewish-roman-war.htm

Referring to when the Jews fled Jerusalem- OK some say 66 AD.  Even if they began to leave in the fall of 66 AD, it may have still been between 66 and 67 AD before all had fled.  Go figure.

-Laodicea
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Bob Pickle

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Jesus had warned that when you see Jerusalem surrounded by armies, to flee immediately, not even going back to get your stuff. So I would think they all would have had to flee in 66, not 67.

One could check to see when the Romans returned.
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Laodicea

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Jesus had warned that when you see Jerusalem surrounded by armies, to flee immediately, not even going back to get your stuff. So I would think they all would have had to flee in 66, not 67.

One could check to see when the Romans returned.

Ok, that's what you presume then.  Yeah the Romans destroyed the temple in 70AD as a direct response to the rebellious uprising of the Jews....  Again- 70 AD. And what's your point?  I have made mine.
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Bob Pickle

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It's just that I think a position is sounder and more convincing if there are as few as possible discrepancies in the details.
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Laodicea

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Discrepancies?  What discrepencies? 

1.) Tell me, what date, oops- dates, do the scholars give for the birth of Jesus?  When was Jesus born?  Do tell. 

One could strain at a gnat if one desires to do so. 

2.) Did Jesus proclaim the acceptable year of the Lord or was Jesus lying when He quoted Isaiah?  Do tell.

Sometimes we can't see the forest for the trees.  What a travesty.

With Concerns,

Laodicea
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Murcielago

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Sometimes the trees can distract from the forest. Sometimes the things that mean the most mean the least. What is the meaning of Jesus? Does your meaning reflect his?
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Laodicea

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Sometimes the trees can distract from the forest. Sometimes the things that mean the most mean the least. What is the meaning of Jesus? Does your meaning reflect his?

I know nothing about God except He reveal Himself through His Holy Word and His Holy Spirit.  As God has instructed me, I don't give my opinion when it comes to discerning scripture/prophecy.  I go to my Father for the understanding and wisdom.  God is ready and willing to supply the bread of life to hungry and needy souls like myself.

Question:  Why did God not let the captive Jews leave Babylon and possess the promised land once again until 70 years were accomplished?

Question:  Why did Jesus appoint 70 disciples and send them out besides the 12? Luke 10:1

This is linked to what Jesus was instructing the disciples and us concerning the 70 times 7.  Jer 25:12, Dan 9:2...Zechariah 7:5-14 and Zechariah 8:7-12,20-23... Isaiah 21:19 and Isaiah 47:16-20- "Go ye forth of Babylon, flee ye from the Chaldeans...!

Sincerely,

LAODICEA

More to come.
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