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Author Topic: Has there been a change in where disasters hit?  (Read 2755 times)

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Bob Pickle

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Has there been a change in where disasters hit?
« on: October 30, 2012, 06:33:34 PM »

A number of years ago I noticed that natural disasters such as tornadoes and hurricanes generally did not hit heavily populated areas, such as cities, at least in the United States.

But we can't say that anymore, can we? Katrina to a large extent wiped out New Orleans. Joplin to a large extent got wiped out by tornadoes. Overseas, that earthquake near Japan devastated that nuclear plant. Before that an earthquake off of Indonesia caused that huge tsunami. Now we have Hurricane Sandy that was even worse than the recent Hurricane Irene.

Has there really been a change in the population density of the areas that get hit? If so, is it just a coincidence, or is there a reason for it?

Sandy hit at the high tide of a full moon. Coincidence?
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christined

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Re: Has there been a change in where disasters hit?
« Reply #1 on: October 30, 2012, 08:21:20 PM »

Joplin, MO is not a densely populated area.  The destruction was beyond imagination, but I don't see the connection between Joplin and the other disaster areas.
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Bob Pickle

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Re: Has there been a change in where disasters hit?
« Reply #2 on: October 31, 2012, 04:24:49 AM »

You're right. Joplin isn't densely populated like the East Coast or the New Orleans area. Midwesterners who live outside little towns sometimes forget that.

But let's lower the bar. Joplin is said to have a population of 50,000. How often in the last century have we had a city of 50,000 or more get walloped like that? During a season when many towns and cities got walloped as well? Even factoring in the growth of urban areas, it seems to me that the frequency has increased from what it used to be, even not too long ago.

Does anyone remember the hurricane that headed toward New Orleans, changed course, headed toward Florida, changed course, headed toward New Orleans, went back and forth like that, and then hit the Gulf Coast where it wasn't as populated? I don't remember the year or the exact sequence of movements or the name of the storm, but it struck me as odd.
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Bob Pickle

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Re: Has there been a change in where disasters hit?
« Reply #3 on: October 31, 2012, 04:37:54 AM »

I remember reading in the SoP somewhere that rather than recognizing in natural disasters warnings of God calling us to repentance, the world's great men attribute it all to mere natural causes. Sure enough: http://www.cnn.com/2012/10/31/us/sandy-climate-change/index.html?hpt=hp_t1

The SoP attributes end-time disasters to Satan's working when God's protective hand is removed. I don't think any believer anywhere of any persuasion will argue that God's protective hand was still in place this week, "global warming" notwithstanding.
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Bob Pickle

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Re: Has there been a change in where disasters hit?
« Reply #4 on: November 01, 2012, 07:42:21 AM »

I bounced this topic off of a convenience store clerk yesterday, and asked him if he thought God was trying to tell us something. He responded, "Yes. He's been trying to tell us something for a long time. But people aren't listening."
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