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reddogs

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'Deception': Christians war over worship day
« on: May 08, 2008, 05:11:12 AM »

This is a great article on the Sabbath....


SABBATH VS. SUNDAY: THE REST OF THE STORY
'Deception': Christians war over worship day
Centuries-old clash continues over disputed commandment

Two thousand years after Jesus walked the Earth, Christians are at war with each other concerning – as strange as it may sound – a day of the week mentioned in the Ten Commandments.
The issue boils down to: "When is God's Sabbath?" In other words, what is His holy day of rest?

Most Christians today think it's Sunday, when the majority of churches hold services.

But others confidently say it's Saturday, calling Sunday worship "the most flagrant error of mainstream Christianity," believing Sunday-keepers are victims of clever deception.

Some high-profile evangelical pastors such as California's Greg Laurie say it's simply "wrong to set Saturday apart as a special day for worship."
Today, some high-school sports teams refuse to play in state tournaments for the sole reason the events are held on Saturday – what they say is God's Sabbath.....

In the beginning ...

There are seven days in a week, but historians have no consensus about the cycle's origin, since it has no basis in astronomy.
The Bible, though, indicates God created the Earth and its life forms in six days, and then rested on the seventh.

"And on the seventh day God ended his work which he had made; and he rested on the seventh day from all his work which he had made. And God blessed the seventh day, and sanctified it." (Genesis 2:2-3)

Biblically speaking, the first six days of the week had no special name. They were simply identified by ordinal numbers, such as the first, second and third day. But the seventh day was given a unique name. In Hebrew, it's "shabbat," meaning "rest." In English, the word is "Sabbath," and it's detailed in the Fourth Commandment.

"Remember the sabbath day, to keep it holy. Six days shalt thou labour, and do all thy work: But the seventh day is the sabbath of the LORD thy God: in it thou shalt not do any work ... . For in six days the LORD made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that in them is, and rested the seventh day: wherefore the LORD blessed the sabbath day." (Exodus 20:8-11)

In many languages, the word used for the seventh day of the week – what we call Saturday – is actually the same word used for "Sabbath." In Greek it is sabbaton; Italian, sabato; Spanish, sábado; Russian, subbota; Polish, sobota; and Hungarian, szómbat. Even the French "samedi" is from the Latin "Sambata dies," for "day of the Sabbath.".....

In the King James Version of the Bible, the word "Sabbath" appears 137 times. The word "Sunday" is absent, though its equivalent, the first day of the week, occurs eight times – nine if the "first day" of creation is counted.

Some examples of the use of Sabbath include:
"Six days may work be done; but in the seventh is the sabbath of rest, holy to the LORD: whosoever doeth any work in the sabbath day, he shall surely be put to death. Wherefore the children of Israel shall keep the sabbath, to observe the sabbath throughout their generations, for a perpetual covenant." (Exodus 31:15-16)
"But pray ye that your flight be not in winter, neither on the sabbath day." (Matthew 24:20)

"Therefore the Son of man is Lord also of the sabbath." (Mark 2:28)
Most biblical scholars have little disagreement when asked what day the Bible specifically calls the Sabbath.



"The seventh day, Saturday," says Richard Bauckham, professor of New Testament at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland. "No other day is called the Sabbath in Old or New Testaments.".....

The last shall be first?
Beyond the resurrection issue, there are several Bible references to "the first day of the week," none of which are clear on the Sabbath issue.


"The New Testament evidence is not conclusive, and nowhere 'ordains' or instructs [Sunday-keeping]," said Margaret M. Mitchell, professor of New Testament and Early Christian Literature at the University of Chicago Divinity School.

Man of the Sabbath
A well-known expert on the Sabbath is Dr. Samuele Bacchiocchi, a retired theology professor at Andrews University in Michigan.

Dr. Samuele Bacchiocchi
Bacchiocchi earned his doctorate in Church History at the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome and was awarded a gold medal by Pope Paul VI for his summa cum laude class work and dissertation, "From Sabbath to Sunday: A Historical Investigation of the Rise of Sunday Observance in Early Christianity."
Bacchiocchi, a Seventh-Day Adventist, believes there's no Scriptural mandate to change or eliminate Sabbath-keeping, and he singles out the Catholic Church for its role in changing the day.

"The Church of the capital of the empire, whose authority was already felt far and wide in the second century, appears to be the most likely birthplace of Sunday observance," he writes.

In the 1876 book, "The Faith of Our Fathers," James Cardinal Gibbons, the Catholic archbishop of Baltimore, agreed the shift to Sunday was not based on the Bible, but was solely the work of the Catholic Church.

"You may read the Bible from Genesis to Revelation, and you will not find a single line authorizing the sanctification of Sunday. The Scriptures enforce the religious observance of Saturday, a day which we never sanctify," Gibbons wrote.
Bacchiocchi also told WND: "Anti-Judaism caused the abandonment of the Sabbath, and pagan sun worship influenced the adoption of Sunday."

He says evidence of anti-Judaism is found in the writings of Christian leaders such as Ignatius, Barnabas and Justin in the second century. He notes these three "witnessed and participated in the process of separation from Judaism which led the majority of the Christians to abandon the Sabbath and adopt Sunday as the new day of worship."

Bacchiocchi also explains the influence of pagan sun worship provides a "plausible explanation for the Christian choice of Sunday" over the day of Saturn. Its effect wasn't just limited to Sunday. It apparently led to the placement of Jesus' birth in late December.

"The adoption of the 25th of December for the celebration of Christmas is perhaps the most explicit example of sun worship's influence on the Christian liturgical calendar," Bacchiocchi writes. "It is a known fact that the pagan feast of the Dies Natalis Solis Invicti – the birthday of the Invincible Sun, was held on that date.".........

http://www.worldnetdaily.com/index.php?fa=PAGE.view&pageId=57978
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Azenilto Brito

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Re: 'Deception': Christians war over worship day
« Reply #1 on: May 12, 2008, 09:59:30 AM »


       Let me add one more linguistic datum:

       In my native Portuguese we don’t have the days of the week with names of pagan origin, as in many languages. The days of the week, except for Saturday (called simply ‘sábado’) and Sunday (‘domingo’) follow an ordinal sequence, so there is no way of confounding things.
       Thus, it's goes like that:

       domingo (Sunday)
       segunda-feira (Monday--“second ‘fair’”)
       terça-feira (Tuesday: should be ‘terceira’, but, there is a little corruption of language; would be, “third ‘fair')
       quarta-feira (Wednesday--“fourth ‘fair’”)
       quinta-feira (Thursday--“fifth ‘fair’”)
       sexta-feira (Friday--“sixth ‘fair’”)
       sábado (Saturday)

       It is common to use shorter ways of referring to the days, like ‘3a. feira’, ‘4a. feira’, ‘5a. feira’. . .

       So, for the millions of people in Brasil (around 180 million), Portugal, Angola, Mozambique, Cape Verde, Guiné-Bissau, East Timor, which have Portuguese as official language, there is no doubt regarding what day of the week is the seventh day.

« Last Edit: May 12, 2008, 10:27:21 AM by Azenilto Brito »
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